Line of succession to the former Italian throne

note:
As of August 2020.

See also:
Line of succession to the former Monarchical throne and others : From (deleted) Wikipedia’s articles.


The Italian monarchy was abolished in June 1946 following a referendum which established a republic. The present pretenders are Vittorio Emanuele, Prince of Naples and Prince Amedeo, Duke of Aosta, who dispute each other’s right to the throne.

Prince of Naples

Vittorio Emanuele, Prince of Naples, is the son of King Umberto II and his successor as head of the House of Savoy. On 7 July 2006, Prince Amedeo, Duke of Aosta, declared himself to be the head of the house and Duke of Savoy.

On 15 January 2020, Vittorio Emanuele announced in a press release that on 28 December 2019 he used his rights and prerogatives as head of the House of Savoy to abolish the Salic Law which governed the line of succession in favor of absolute primogeniture, allowing his descendants to succeed by birth order regardless of sex on the basis of “equality between the sexes and moreover, an application of both accepted and implemented by extensive international normative”.[1] He cited “the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, applied in the Treaty of Lisbon of 2009, which reaffirmed the principle of equality between men and women and the values and objectives of the European Union”.[2]

On the same day, in response to this act, the Italian Monarchist Union had announced that they opposed this act of change in the line of succession made by the Prince of Naples.[3]

The line of succession to this claim is as follows:

  • King Umberto II (1904–1983)
    • Vittorio Emanuele, Prince of Naples (born 1937)
      • (1) Emanuele Filiberto, Prince of Venice (b. 1972)
        • (2) Vittoria, Princess of Carignano (b. 2003)
        • (3) Luisa, Princess of Chieri (b. 2006)

 

 

Duke of Aosta

The Duke of Aosta claims that because Vittorio Emanuele married in violation of the House of Savoy’s dynastic law he forfeited his dynastic rights. Aldo Alessandro Mola, president of the former Council of the Senators of the Kingdom, published a declaration in favour of Amedeo’s claim; and he also received the support of Vittorio Emanuele’s sister Princess Maria Gabriella of Savoy.

The line of succession to this claim is as follows:

  • King Vittorio Emanuele II (1820–1878)
    • King Umberto I (1844–1900)
      • King Vittorio Emanuele III (1869–1947)
        • King Umberto II (1904–1983)
    • Prince Amedeo, 1st Duke of Aosta (1845–1890)
      • Prince Emanuele Filiberto, 2nd Duke of Aosta (1869–1931)
        • Prince Aimone, 4th Duke of Aosta (1900–1948)
          • Prince Amedeo, 5th Duke of Aosta (born 1943)
            • (1) Prince Aimone, Duke of Apulia (b. 1967)
              • (2) Prince Umberto of Savoy-Aosta (b. 2009)
              • (3) Prince Amedeo of Savoy-Aosta (b. 2011)[4]

 

 

Line of succession in June 1946

  • King Carlo Alberto of Sardinia (1798–1849)
    • King Vittorio Emanuele II (1820–1878)
      • King Umberto I (1844–1900)
        • King Vittorio Emanuele III (born 1869)
          • King Umberto II (born 1904)
            • (1) Vittorio Emanuele, Prince of Piedmont (b. 1937)
      • Prince Amedeo, Duke of Aosta (King Amadeo I of Spain) (1845–1890)
        • Prince Emanuele Filiberto, Duke of Aosta (1869–1931)
          • (2) Prince Aimone, Duke of Aosta (b. 1900)
            • (3) Prince Amedeo, Duke of Apulia (b. 1943)>[5]
        • (4) Prince Vittorio Emanuele, Count of Turin (b. 1870)
    • Prince Ferdinando, Duke of Genoa (1822–1855)
      • Prince Tommaso, Duke of Genoa (1854–1931)
        • (5) Prince Ferdinando, Duke of Genoa (b. 1884)
        • (6) Prince Filiberto, Duke of Pistoia (b. 1895)
        • (7) Prince Adalberto, Duke of Bergamo (b. 1898)
        • (8) Prince Eugenio, Duke of Ancona (b. 1906)

The dukes of Genoa male line ultimately became extinct upon the death of Prince Eugenio, the last surviving male agnate of this line, in 1996. In turn, this left only the main Savoy royal male line and the Savoy-Aosta male line.

Clashes

On 21 May 2004 blows were struck in Madrid between the Crown Prince and the Duke of Aosta. At a soirée held at the Zarzuela Palace during the wedding celebrations of the Prince of Asturias, Amedeo approached Vittorio who reportedly punched him twice in the face, causing him to stumble backward down the steps.[6][7] The quick intervention of Queen Anne-Marie of Greece, who propped him up, prevented the Duke from falling to the ground.[7] She discreetly assisted him indoors while staunching his bleeding face until first aid was administered.[6] Upon learning of the incident, King Juan Carlos of Spain reportedly declared that “never again” would an opportunity to abuse his hospitality be afforded the competing pretenders.[6][7] The Queen’s quick action avoided what might have been more serious injury to Amedeo and a public escalation of the confrontation.

In response to the Duke of Aosta’s attempt in 2006 to assume the headship of the house, and his and his son’s assumption of the name “di Savoia” along with the undifferenced arms of the Royal House of Savoy and of the Prince of Piedmont, the Prince of Naples and his son filed a lawsuit against the Aosta branch. The lawsuit was successful, the court of Arezzo ruling in February 2010 that the Duke of Aosta and his son must pay damages totalling 50,000 euros to their cousins and cease their use of the arms of the Royal House and those of the Prince of Piedmont.[8] They were also forbidden to use the name “di Savoia”, instead they must resume the name “di Savoia-Aosta”.[9] The Duke of Aosta is appealing the ruling.[10]

Line of succession to the former Monarchical throne and others : From (deleted) Wikipedia’s articles.

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Line of succession to the former Saxon thrones

note:
As of July 2020.

See also:
Line of succession to the former Monarchical throne and others : From (deleted) Wikipedia’s articles.


Albertine Wettins

Royal House of Saxony

The Kingdom of Saxony was abolished in 1918 when King Frederick Augustus III of Saxony abdicated. The succession law until the abolition of the monarchy was semi-Salic primogeniture and required the successor to be born of an equal marriage, approved in advance by the head of the house.[1] Accordingly, the last undisputed male member of the family was Prince Albert of Saxony, who assumed the headship of the royal house and the title Margrave of Meissen upon the death of his brother the Margrave Maria Emanuel in July 2012. This was challenged, however, by his nephew Prince Alexander of Saxe-Gessaphe who also claimed the headship based on a 1997 agreement, and who is said to have reached an agreement with Albert just prior to the funeral of Maria Emanuel which recognised Alexander as the dynasty’s heir.[2] With the death of Albert in October 2012 the dispute continued with Prince Rüdiger of Saxony, the only agnatic great grandson of the last King of Saxony, claiming the headship.

The conflict over the headship stems from the fact that the last undisputed head of the house Maria Emanuel, Margrave of Meissen, and the other princes of his generation either had no children or, in the case of Prince Timo, had children (including Prince Rüdiger of Saxony) who were not recognised by Margrave Maria Emanuel as dynastic members of the Royal House of Saxony.[3][4] The first designated dynastic heir of Maria Emanuel was his and Albert’s nephew Prince Johannes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, only son of their youngest sister Princess Mathilde of Saxony by her marriage to Prince Johannes Heinrich of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, dynast of a ducal branch of the House of Wettin senior patrilineally to the royal branch.[4]

In 2014 the Deutscher Adelsrechtsausschuss (basically a deciding body of the associations of the German nobility with regard to questions of historical nobility law) issued an expert opinion that the Albertine line of the House of Wettin became extinct with the death of Maria Emanuel, Margrave of Meissen in 2012. None of the remaining family members, who bear the legal surname “Prinz von Sachsen Herzog zu Sachsen”, are allowed to use the style His/Her Royal Highness. Because there is no longer a head of the royal house, no family member has the right to use the title Margrave of Meissen.[5][6]

Claim of Alexander, Margrave of Meissen

After the early death of Prince Johannes, the heirless Maria Emanuel then considered as potential heir another nephew, Alexander Afif, the eldest son of Princess Anna of Saxony and her husband Roberto Afif, despite the fact Alexander was only a female line Wettin descendant whose parents’ marriage had, at the time, been morganatic,[3] and were contrary to the house laws of the Saxon royal house and of the Saxon Kingdom’s constitution, both of which required equal marriage for descendants to inherit dynastic rights.[1][4][7]

On 14 May 1997 the Margrave of Meissen proposed his nephew Alexander Afif as heir and drew up a document that was signed by the other male and female members of the royal house (including previously non-dynastic spouses of princes) setting out that Alexander would succeed on his death. The document was signed by:

  • Anastasia, Margravine of Meissen (born 1940), the Margrave’s wife
  • Prince Albert of Saxony (1934–2012), the Margrave’s younger brother
  • Princess Elmira of Saxony (born 1930), Prince Albert’s wife
  • Prince Dedo of Saxony (1922–2009), the Margrave’s cousin. He also signed on behalf of:
    • his brother Prince Gero of Saxony (1925–2003)
    • his stepmother Princess Virginia of Saxony (1910–2002), widow of Prince Ernst Heinrich of Saxony
  • Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony (born 1928), the Margrave’s sister
  • Princess Anna of Saxony (1929–2012), the Margrave’s sister
  • Princess Mathilde of Saxony (1936-2018), the Margrave’s sister
  • Princess Erina of Saxony (1921–2010), widow of the Margrave’s cousin Prince Timo of Saxony.[8]

Two years later on 1 July 1999 the Margrave adopted his nephew Alexander Afif.[9]

Until his adoption, Alexander had used the title Alexander, Prince of Saxe-Gessaphe since 1972,[10] based on his claim to patrilineal descent from a Maronite Christian family of historical emirs and sheikhs in Lebanon, the “Afif” (or Gessaphe) dynasty.[11][12][12] Some sources now attribute princely rank to this family,[11] while others have ascribed to it a lesser status.[4] Since Alexander had fathered three sons and a daughter by his 1987 marriage to Princess Gisela of Bavaria (b. 1964),[13] his selection as heir offered the likelihood of compliance with the dynasty’s traditional marital rules for another generation.

The 1997 agreement proved to be controversial and in the summer of 2002 three of the signatories, Princes Albert, Dedo and Gero (the latter consented via proxy but had not personally signed the document)[14] retracted their support for the agreement.[2][15] The following year Prince Albert wrote that it is through Prince Ruediger and his sons that the direct line of the Albertine branch of the House of Wettin will continue, and thus avoid becoming extinct.[16] Until his death, however, the Margrave, as head of the former dynasty, continued to regard his nephew and adopted son, Prince Alexander, as the contractual heir entitled to succeed.[17]

Immediately following the death of Maria Emanuel in July 2012, Prince Albert assumed the position of head of the Royal House of Saxony.[2] According to the Eurohistory Journal prior to the Margrave’s funeral Albert met with his nephew, Alexander and recognised him as Margrave of Meissen.[2][18] However this claim is contradicted by Albert himself in his final interview, given after the funeral, where he states that he needs recognition as Margrave of Meissen.[19] Prince Alexander, citing the 1997 agreement has also assumed the headship.[2][20] Albert, Margrave of Meissen died at a hospital in Munich on 6 October 2012 at the age of 77.

Prior to the requiem for Margrave Maria Emanuel, Ruediger, who had sought to be recognised by his uncle as a dynastic member of the House of Saxony but was refused, conducted a demonstration outside the cathedral with Saxon royalists in protest against the late Margrave Maria Emanuel’s decision to appoint Alexander as heir.[21] Following Albert’s death, Prince Ruediger declared himself as the head of the house.[22]

In a joint statement of 23 June 2015, the heads of the three remaining branches of the senior Ernestine line of the House of Wettin, Michael, Prince of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, Andreas, Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Konrad, Prince of Saxe-Meiningen, declared that, according to the house law of the House of Wettin and to traditional princely succession rules, Alexander Afif, bearing the name Prince of Saxony by adoption, were neither a member of nobility nor of the House of Wettin, nor had he succeeded Maria Emanuel as head of the Albertine branch (the Royal House of Saxony), nor were he entitled to style himself Margrave of Meissen.[23]

The line of succession within the Saxe-Gessaphe line is:

  • Margrave Alexander (born 1954)[24]
    • (1) Prince Georg Philipp (b. 1988)[24]
    • (2) Prince Mauricio (b. 1989)[24]
    • (3) Prince Paul-Clemens (b. 1993)[24]

 

 

Claim of Rüdiger, Margrave of Meissen

The other claimant to the headship of the Royal House is Prince Rüdiger of Saxony, the only direct male line great grandson of the last king of Saxony. He was born into the cadet Moritzburg branch of the Royal House of Saxony, which was named after the palace where his grandfather and the founder of the branch Prince Ernst Heinrich of Saxony lived and where Ruediger and his family returned to after German reunification. Prince Ernst Heinrich had three sons the Princes Dedo (1922-2009), Timo (1923-1982) and Gero (1925-2003), however only Prince Timo married and had issue including an only son Prince Ruediger. Like the Afif-Saxony marriage, the marriage of Ruediger’s father to his mother Margrit Lucas was also morganatic.

If equality requirements are discarded as a direct male line descendant of the kings of Saxony the head of the Royal House is Prince Ruediger. The last surviving undisputed male dynast Prince Albert wrote in 2003 that it will be through Prince Ruediger and his sons that the direct line of the Albertine branch of the House of Wettin will continue, and thus avoid becoming extinct.[25] Prince Ruediger himself never accepted the 1997 agreement and when asked for his opinion on who the eventual successor to Maria Emanuel should be he replied that it should be himself.[26]

Following the death of Maria Emanuel in July 2012, Prince Ruediger recognised Prince Albert as the new Margrave of Meissen and head of the Royal House of Saxony. According to the family website prior to his death Albert determined Ruediger to be his successor and instituted a clear succession plan.[27] On this basis following Albert’s death Prince Ruediger assumed the headship of the house.[28]

The Moritzburg branch, in order of primogeniture, is:

  • Margrave Ruediger (born 1953)[24]
    • (1) Prince Daniel (b. 1975)[24]
      • (2) Prince Gero (b. 2015)[29]
    • (3) Prince Arne (b. 1977)[24]
    • (4) Prince Nils (b. 1978)[24]
      • (5) Prince Moritz (b. 2009)[24]

 

 

Claim of Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern

Yet another potential successor to the former monarchy’s royal crown, due to the semi-Salic succession law used in Saxony, is Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern. He is the eldest son and heir of Friedrich Wilhelm, Prince of Hohenzollern (1924–2010), who was the son of Princess Margaret of Saxony (1900–1962), the eldest aunt of Maria Emanuel, Margrave of Meissen. The succession would fall to Prince Karl Friedrich in case the marriage of Anna, the mother of the Saxe-Gessaphe claimant and elder sister of the margrave, is deemed non-dynastic despite the actions of the margrave and agnates to de-morganatize it.

His claim would also depend upon there having been no family pact (Erbverbrüderung) which allocated the kingdom to another dynasty upon extinction of the royal Wettins’ male line, since Saxony’s constitution explicitly recognized the validity of such pacts.[1][30] After Karl Friedrich, who had also been considered in the line of succession to the defunct throne of Romania, there is also a line of succession potentially applicable to the Saxon royal claim.

Line of Succession in November 1918

  • George, King of Saxony (1832–1904)
    • Frederick Augustus III of Saxony (born 1865)
      • (1) Georg, Crown Prince of Saxony (born 1893)
      • (2) Prince Friedrich Christian of Saxony (born 1893)
      • (3) Prince Ernst Heinrich of Saxony (born 1896)
    • (4) Prince Johann Georg of Saxony (born 1869)
    • Prince Maximilian of Saxony (born 1870), renounced succession rights

Ernestine Wettins

In the house laws of the Kingdom of Saxony, succession is restricted to the Albertinischer Linie, a term which referred exclusively to Wettin dynasts of the royal branch, male and female, eligible to inherit Saxony’s throne,[1] and may constitute exclusion of claims by Ernestine agnates of the other branch of the House of Wettin. Paragraph 6 of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Saxony, however, states: Die Krone ist erblich in dem Mannsstamme des Sächsischen Fürstenhauses nach dem Rechte der Erstgeburt und der agnatischen Linealfolge, vermöge Abstammung aus ebenbürtiger Ehe. (“The crown is hereditary in the male line of the Saxon princely house in accordance with the principle of primogeniture and agnatic lineal succession, by virtue of descent from equal marriage”). Since the “Sächsischen Fürstenhauser” included all dynastic members of the various branches of the House of Wettin which ruled the Ernestine duchies until 1918, any of these agnates fit this requirement and might, theoretically, claim the royal Saxon throne in accordance with primogeniture.[improper synthesis?] This rationale could make the titular Grand Duke of Saxony, Michael, Prince of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, the royal heir by primogeniture after extinction of the Albertine branch (which is the most junior line of the House of Wettin although it alone attained the rank of a kingdom within Germany).

One or more of the Ernestine Wettins may also have claims superior to descendants of both female and de-morganatized Albertine dynasts if an Erbverbrüderung had been signed between the Albertine and any of the Ernestine branches of the dynasty. There are a number of extant lines of the House of Wettin (Weimar, Meiningen and Coburg; and the most junior of them, Coburg, includes the sub-branches of Windsor, Coburg proper, Koháry, Bulgaria and Belgium) who ruled the various Ernestine duchies and other realms.

It should, again, be borne in mind that Saxony’s royal constitution required that any successor to the throne be born of an equal (ebenbürtig) marriage, therefore Wettins who may qualify as dynastic princes under other house laws, might not be eligible under royal Saxon law:

Grand Ducal House of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach

  • Grand Duke Wilhelm Ernst (1876–1923)
    • Hereditary Grand Duke Carl August (1912–1988), Head of the Grand Ducal House (1923-1988)
      • Prince Michael (born 1946), Head of the Grand Ducal House (since 1988)[24][31]
    • Prince Bernhard (1917–1986)
      • (1) Prince Wilhelm Ernst (b. 1946)[24][31]

 

 

Ducal House of Saxe-Meiningen

  • Duke Georg II (1826–1914)
    • Prince Ernst (1859–1941), Head of the Ducal House (1928-1941)
      • Has living male non-dynastic descendants the Barons von Saalfeld
    • Prince Friedrich (1861–1914)
      • Prince Bernhard (1901–1984), Head of the Ducal House (1946-1984)
        • Frederick, Prince of Saxe-Meiningen (1935-2004), non-dynastical member by the first morganatical marriage of his father
          • Friedrich Constantin, Prince of Saxe-Meiningen (born 1980), possible successor of the Head of the Ducal House
        • Prince Konrad (born 1952), Head of the Ducal House (since 1984)[24]

 

 

Ducal House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) in 1863, and Arthur, Duke of Connaught in 1899, both deferred their rights and those of their descendants to the ducal throne of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, in favor of their nephew, Prince Charles Edward, Duke of Albany. These deferrals are not relevant to the royal Saxon succession, however British dynasts may have contracted marriages that would be considered morganatic by royal Saxon standards. If not, Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester is the senior descendant in the British male line of the Dukes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

Otherwise, in 1932 Hereditary Prince Johann Leopold (son of Duke Charles Edward) made a non-dynastic marriage whereupon, under the then house laws, his descendants lost any rights to the succession of the ducal throne. The present Head of the Ducal House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha is Prince Andreas, the grandson of Charles Edward, last reigning Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

  • Duke Franz (1750–1806)
    • Duke Ernst I (1784–1844)
      • Prince Albert (1819–1861)
        • King Edward VII of the United Kingdom (1841–1910)
          • British Royal Family
        • Prince Leopold (1853–1884)
          • Duke Carl Eduard (1884–1954)
            • Hereditary Prince Johann Leopold (1906–1972)
              • Has living male non-dynastic descendants
            • Prince Friedrich Josias (1918–1998), Head of the Ducal House (1954-1998)
              • Prince Andreas (born 1943), Head of the Ducal House (since 1998)[24][31]
                • (1) Hereditary Prince Hubertus (b. 1975)[24][31]
                  • (2) Prince Philipp (b. 2015)[24][31]
                • (3) Prince Alexander (b. 1977)[24][31]
              • Prince Adrian (1955–2011)
                • Has living male non-dynastic descendants[24][31]
    • Prince Ferdinand (1785–1851)
      • Prince August (1818–1881)
        • Prince Ludwig August (1845–1907)
          • Prince August Leopold (1867–1922)
            • Prince Philipp Josias (1901–1985)
              • Has living male non-dynastic descendants[24][31]
        • King Ferdinand I of Bulgaria (1861–1948)
          • Bulgarian Royal Family[31]
    • King Leopold I of Belgium (1790–1865)
      • Belgian Royal Family
  •  

     

    Lines of Succession in November 1918

    Grand Ducal House of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach
    • Karl August, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1757–1828)
      • Charles Frederick, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1783–1853)
        • Charles Alexander, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1818–1901)
          • Charles Augustus, Hereditary Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1844–1894)
            • William Ernest, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (born 1876)
              • (1) Charles Augustus, Hereditary Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (b. 1912)
              • (2) Prince Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (b. 1917)
      • Prince Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1792–1862)
        • Prince Hermann of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1825–1901)
          • (3) Prince Wilhelm of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (b. 1853)
    Ducal House of Saxe-Meiningen
    • Duke Georg II (1826–1914)
      • Bernhard III, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen (born 1851)
      • (1) Prince Ernst (b. 1859)
        • Had living male non-dynastic descendants the Barons von Saalfeld
      • Prince Friedrich (1861–1914)
        • (2) Prince Georg (b. 1892)
        • (3) Prince Bernhard (b. 1901)
    Ducal House of Saxe-Altenburg
    • Ernst II, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg (born 1871)
      • (1) Georg Moritz, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Altenburg (b.1900)
      • (2) Prince Frederick Ernst (b. 1905)
    Ducal House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
    • Duke Franz (1750–1806)
      • Duke Ernst I (1784–1844)
        • Prince Albert (1819–1861)
          • King Edward VII of the United Kingdom (1841–1910)
            • King George V of the United Kingdom (b. 1865) (British dynasts considered to forfeit succession rights)
              • Edward, Prince of Wales (b. 1894)
              • Prince Albert of the United Kingdom (b. 1895)
              • Prince Henry of the United Kingdom (b. 1900)
              • Prince George of the United Kingdom (b. 1902)
              • Prince John of the United Kingdom (b. 1905)
          • Duke Alfred (1844–1900)
          • Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (b. 1850)
            • Prince Arthur of Connaught (b. 1883)
              • Prince Alastair of Connaught (b. 1912)
          • Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany (1853–1884)
            • Duke Carl Eduard (born 1884)
              • (1) Hereditary Prince Johann Leopold (b. 1906)
              • (2) Prince Hubertus (b. 1909)
      • Prince Ferdinand (1785–1851)
        • King Ferdinand II of Portugal (1816–1885)
          • King Luís I of Portugal (1838–1889)
            • King Carlos I of Portugal (1863–1908)
              • (3) King Manuel II of Portugal (b. 1889)
            • (4) Infante Afonso, Duke of Porto (b. 1865)
        • Prince August (1818–1881)
          • (5) Prince Philipp (b. 1844)
          • Prince Ludwig August (1845–1907)
            • (6) Prince Pedro Augusto (b. 1866)
            • (7) Prince August Leopold (b. 1867)
              • (8) Prince Rainier (b. 1900)
              • (9) Prince Philipp Josias (b. 1901)
              • (10) Prince Ernst (b. 1907)
            • (11) Prince Ludwig Gaston (b. 1870)
              • (12) Prince Antonius (b. 1901)
          • (13) King Ferdinand I of Bulgaria (b. 1861)
            • (14) King Boris III of Bulgaria (b. 1893)
            • (15) Kiril, Prince of Preslav (b. 1895)
      • Leopold I of Belgium (1790–1865)
        • Prince Philippe, Count of Flanders (1837–1905)
          • King Albert I of Belgium (b. 1875) (Belgian dynasts considered to forfeit succession rights)
            • Prince Leopold, Duke of Brabant (b. 1901)
            • Prince Charles, Count of Flanders (b. 1903)

Princess Elisabetta of Belgium, Archduchess of Austria-Este

note:
As of August 2020.
(I brought some sections from old revision.)

See also:
Line of succession to the former Monarchical throne and others : From (deleted) Wikipedia’s articles.


Princess Elisabetta
Born (1987-09-09) 9 September 1987 (age 32)
Rome, Italy
Spouse
Prince Amedeo of Belgium, Archduke of Austria-Este

(m. 2014)

Issue Archduchess Anna Astrid
Archduke Maximilian
Full name
Elisabetta Maria
Father Ettore Rosboch von Wolkenstein
Mother Lilia de Smecchia

Princess Elisabetta of Belgium (née Elisabetta Rosboch von Wolkenstein on 9 September 1987), Archduchess of Austria-Este, is an Italian-born member of the Belgian royal family. She is the wife of Prince Amedeo of Belgium, Archduke of Austria-Este.

Birth and family

Elisabetta, an Italian aristocrat and journalist, was born in Rome on 9 September 1987, the only child of Italian film producer Ettore Rosboch von Wolkenstein (born in 1945) and his wife Anna Maria “Lilia” dei Conti di Smecchia, also a film producer.

Her godfather and uncle was the so-called “editor prince” Don Carlo Caracciolo, 9th Prince di Castagneto and 4th Duke di Melito, who, with Donna Marella Caracciolo di Castagneto, wife of Fiat tycoon Gianni Agnelli, are Ettore’s half-siblings, all children of Don Filippo Caracciolo, 8th Prince di Castagneto, Elisabetta’s grandfather.[1]

Elisabetta’s paternal grandmother, née Elisabeth [2][3] Jaworski von Wolkenstein (1915-1959) had been a widow for months[4] of Italian Finance Undersecretary Nob. Ettore Bernardo Rosboch (19 Apr 1893 – 18 Aug 1944),[5] when her son Ettore was born to Don Filippo[1] (Carlo and Marella Caracciolo were born of his marriage to American heiress Margaret Clarke).[6] In 2008 Don Carlo left Elisabetta and her father US$1 million in his will.[1] Elisabetta’s godmother is her aunt, Countess Muni Sassoli de’ Bianchi, her mother’s sister.[7]

Education and career

Elisabetta obtained her baccalauréat at Rome’s Lycée Chateaubriand in Economics and Social Sciences in 2005. She then moved to London to study comparative literature and film at Queen Mary University of London. She received a bachelor of arts degree with upper-class honours from Queen Mary in May 2009.[7]

Since September 2009, Elisabetta has worked for Bloomberg News’ cultural section.[8]

Marriage and children

On 15 February 2014, the Belgian Royal Court announced the engagement of Elisabetta and Prince Amedeo.[9]

The couple’s wedding was celebrated on 5 July 2014 in Rome’s Basilica Santa Maria in Trastevere,[10][11] in the presence of the Belgian royal family (with the exception of his elderly great-aunt Queen Fabiola), as well as members of the cadet branches of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine, including the bridegroom’s grandmother, Margherita of Savoy, Dowager Archduchess of Austria-Este, and members of other dynasties, including Princess Margaretha of Luxembourg and her husband Prince Nikolaus of Liechtenstein, Princess Beatrice of York and Jean-Christophe, Prince Napoléon.[12] The couple were planning to relocate in Belgium after the wedding.

Their daughter, Archduchess Anna Astrid, was born on 17 May 2016 at UMC Sint-Pieter in Brussels.[13][14][15] On 6 September 2019 their second child, Archduke Maximilian, was born.[16]

Titles and styles

  • 9 September 1987 – 5 July 2014: Nobile Elisabetta Rosboch von Wolkenstein
  • 5 July 2014 – present: Her Imperial and Royal Highness Princess Elisabetta of Belgium, Archduchess of Austria-Este, Princess Royal of Hungary and Bohemia, Princess of Modena

Line of succession to the former Hanoverian throne : From (deleted) Wikipedia’s articles.

note:
As of July 2020.
This article based on the Wikipedia’s same name article.
However, it doesn’t number Prince Nicolás (b. 2020).

That Wikipedia’s article has deleted by Wikipedians.

See also:
Line of succession to the former Monarchical throne and others : From (deleted) Wikipedia’s articles.


The following is the Line of succession to the former Hanoverian throne:

The Kingdom of Hanover was abolished in 1866 and the Duchy of Brunswick in 1918. The Hanoverian royal family was also deprived of the Dukedom of Cumberland and Teviotdale in 1919. The current senior male-line descendant of George III of the United Kingdom and head of the House of Hanover is Ernst August, Prince of Hanover, titular King of Hanover, Duke of Brunswick, and Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale. The Succession Law in Hanover and Brunswick is semi-salic, allowing for female succession but only on the extinction of the male line of the house.[1]

  • King George V of Hanover (1819–1878)
    • Prince Ernst August, Crown Prince of Hanover, 3rd Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale (1845–1923)
      • Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick (1887–1953)
        • Ernest Augustus, Prince of Hanover (1914–1987)
          • Ernst August, Prince of Hanover (b. 1954)
            • (1) Prince Ernst August of Hanover (b. 1983)
              • Prince Welf August of Hanover (b. 2019)
            • (2) Prince Christian of Hanover (b. 1985)
              • Prince Nicolás of Hanover (b. 2020)
          • Prince Ludwig Rudolph of Hanover (1955–1988)
            • (3) Prince Otto Heinrich of Hanover (b. 1988)
          • (4) Prince Heinrich Julius of Hanover (b. 1961)
            • (5) Prince Albert of Hanover (b. 1999)
            • (6) Prince Julius of Hanover (b. 2006)
        • Prince George William of Hanover (1915–2006)

 

 

Note: Prince Ernst August, head of the House of Hanover since 1987, refused to give consent to his eldest son Hereditary Prince Ernst August’s marriage to Ekaterina Malysheva. As a result the couple’s children do not hold dynastic rights.[2]

Line of Succession in 1866

  • King George III of Hanover (1738–1820)
    • King George IV of Hanover (1762–1830)
    • King William of Hanover (1765–1837)
    • Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover (1771–1851)
      • King George V of Hanover (born 1819)
        • (1) Ernst August, Crown Prince of Hanover (b. 1845)
    • Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge (1774–1850)
      • (2) Prince George, Duke of Cambridge (b. 1819)

In the event of the extinction of the above royal line the succession was to pass to the ducal Brunswick line.[1] Living members of that line in 1866 were:

  • Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1771–1815)
    • (3) Charles II, ex reigning Duke of Brunswick (b. 1804)
    • (4) William, Duke of Brunswick (b. 1806)